Here's everything we could find about: "VirtualBox"

17
Jun

How To: Install VirtualBox 4.0 on Fedora 15

This is a step by step tutorial on how to get VirtualBox 4.0 up and running on Fedora 15 (Lovelock). Specifically, this guide was written using the VirtualBox 4.0 (32-bit) version (Package: kernel-devel.i686 0:2.6.38.8-32.fc15). It can be adapted to upcoming versions and different CPUs (64-bit). The folks at VirtualBox have made it easy to install for Fedora users and I’m going to show you how in a few easy steps. Open a terminal window and let’s get to it…
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2
Nov

How To: Install VirtualBox 3.2 on Fedora 14

This is a step by step tutorial on how to get VirtualBox 3.2 up and running on Fedora 14. Specifically, this guide was written using the VirtualBox 3.2.10 (32-bit) version. It can be adapted to upcoming versions and different CPUs (64-bit). The folks at VirtualBox have made it easy to install for Fedora users and I’m going to show you how in a few easy steps. Right, open a terminal window and let’s get to it…
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25
May

How To: Install VirtualBox 3.2 on Fedora 13

This is a step by step tutorial on how to get VirtualBox 3.2 up and running on Fedora 13. Specifically, this guide was written using the VirtualBox 3.2.0 (32-bit) version. It can be adapted to upcoming versions and different CPUs (64-bit). The folks at VirtualBox have made it easy to install for Fedora users and I’m going to show you how in a few easy steps. Right, open a terminal window and let’s get to it…
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6
Feb

How-To: Setup a Pre-Built VirtualBox Guest Image [Tutorial/Guide]

Table of Contents

Introduction

This guide will assist in loading a pre-built VirtualBox image. The example used is a pre-built Ubuntu 9.10 “Karmic Koala” guest image. Any VirtualBox image can be used however.

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4
Feb

Shrinking a Dynamic VirtualBox Disk Image

I hadn’t realized this before, but you can shrink a dynamic VirtualBox disk image. This is incredibly helpful if you’ve uninstalled programs or freed up a bunch of space and you want the .vdi image size to reflect that. Otherwise, the dynamic disk image will stay the same size it was before. The process is simple, but can be a bit involved so I’ll just touch on the basics and then refer you to a few guides that were really helpful when I did this for my Ubuntu 9.10 VirtualBox image. These guides can be applied to other guest images as well.

1.) Install “zerofree” on your virtualbox guest machine.
2.) Boot to safe mode (recovery mode) where you can access your root partition (/dev/sda1).
3.) Mount the root partition as read-only (mount -o ro /dev/sda1 /mnt/tmp)
4.) Run “zerofree /dev/sda1”
5.) Shutdown the virtual machine and run “VBoxManage modifyhd –compact /path/to/virtualboximage.vdi”

In-Depth Guides:
http://maketecheasier.com/shrink-your-virtualbox-vm/2009/04/06 — Keep in mind that zerofree does in fact support ext4 (I think this article is a tiny bit dated, but it’s a great one).

http://www.virtualbox.org/manual/UserManual.html — The all important VirtualBox Users Guide.

http://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?p=29272#29272 — Another good reference for VirtualBox

27
Oct

How To: Install VirtualBox 3 on Fedora 12 [Tutorial]

Updated: 11/22/2009

This is a step by step tutorial on how to get VirtualBox 3 up and running on Fedora 12. Specifically, this guide was written using the VirtualBox 3.0.8 version and an i386 CPU (32-bit). It can be adapted to upcoming versions and different CPUs (64-bit). The folks at VirtualBox have made it easy to install for Fedora users and I’m going to show you how in a few easy steps. Right, open a terminal window and let’s get to it…
[Read more →]

9
Jun

How To: Install VirtualBox on Fedora 11 [Tutorial]

Note: I have been unable to verify these steps. They should work just fine, but I’m a little concerned about the USB support fix. You may or may not want to try it at this point. I have it here just as a reference for now.

This is a tutorial on how to get VirtualBox up and running on Fedora 11. Also, this tutorial is for the 32-Bit version of VirtualBox, so you’ll have to customize a little more to get the 64-bit version running. Everything in the “code” sections should be copy/pasted/typed into the terminal. Right, let’s get to it:

PreStep.) Open the terminal and get into super user mode:
su -

1.) Get the latest VirtualBox package (as of now, 2.2.4) from the VirtualBox website for Fedora 11 and install it.  The following command should download and install the application:
wget http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/2.2.4/VirtualBox-2.2.4_47978_fedora11-1.i586.rpm && rpm -ivh VirtualBox-2.2.4_47978_fedora11-1.i586.rpm

2.) Get the kernel-devel and other needed packages:
yum install make automake autoconf gcc kernel-devel dkms

3.) Run the setup file for VirtualBox:
/etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup

4.) Add yourself to the “vboxusers” group and fix the SELinux Permissions:
usermod -G vboxusers -a username
chcon -t textrel_shlib_t /usr/lib/virtualbox/VirtualBox.so

5.) Run, and enjoy!
VirtualBox

6.) To Get USB Support:

1 – create a new group called “usb”;
2 – locate file usbfs: in my case is /sys/bus/usb/drivers (I suggest to find the file with a usb device inserted;
3 – modify file /etc/fstab inserting a line containing the right path and the number corresponding the “usb” group :
none /sys/bus/usb/drivers usbfs devgid=503,devmode=664 0 0
4 – command mount -a;
5 – start VB and try…;

Source: Fedora Forums

7.) To Properly Backup the VirtualBox Machine (.vdi):

Please refer to my other page here:

How To: Properly Backup a VirtualBox Machine (.VDI)

8.) To Get Sound Working:

Highlight your virtual machine and click on the “Settings” button. Click on the “Sound” category, and then check the “Enable Sound” option. In the drop-down box, select “PulseAudio”. You should now have sound.

That’s it! If you find yourself with problems, feel free to comment below or ask for assistance on the fedora forum thread that I have created located here.

25
Nov

How To: Install VirtualBox on Fedora 10 [Tutorial]

Updated November 25th, 2008

This is a tutorial on how to get VirtualBox up and running on Fedora 10.  Also, this tutorial is for the 32-Bit version of VirtualBox, so you’ll have to customize a little more to get the 64-bit version running. Everything in the “code” sections should be copy/pasted/typed into the terminal. Right, let’s get to it:

PreStep.) Open the terminal and get into super user mode:

su -

1.) Get the latest VirtualBox package (as of now, 2.0.6) from the VirtualBox website for Fedora 9 and install it (generally, after a few months, the Fedora 10 link will be available).

wget http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/2.0.6/VirtualBox-2.0.6_39765_fedora9-1.i386.rpm && rpm -ivh VirtualBox-2.0.6_39765_fedora9-1.i386.rpm

2.) Get the kernel-devel package:

yum install make automake autoconf gcc kernel-devel dkms

3.) Run the setup file for VirtualBox:

/etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup

4.) Add yourself to the “vboxusers” group and fix the SELinux Permissions:

usermod -G vboxusers -a username
chcon -t textrel_shlib_t /usr/lib/virtualbox/VirtualBox.so

5.) Run, and enjoy!

VirtualBox

6.) To Get USB Support:

1 – create a new group called “usb”;
2 – locate file usbfs: in my case is /sys/bus/usb/drivers (I suggest to find the file with a usb device inserted;
3 – modify file /etc/fstab inserting a line containing the right path and the number corresponding the “usb” group :
none /sys/bus/usb/drivers usbfs devgid=503,devmode=664 0 0
4 – command mount -a;
5 – start VB and try…;

Source: Fedora Forums

7.) To Properly Backup the VirtualBox Machine (.vdi):

Please refer to my other page here:

How To: Properly Backup a VirtualBox Machine (.VDI)

8.) To Get Sound Working:

Highlight your virtual machine and click on the “Settings” button. Click on the “Sound” category, and then check the “Enable Sound” option. In the drop-down box, select “PulseAudio”. You should now have sound.

That’s it!  If you find yourself with problems, feel free to comment below or ask for assistance on the fedora forum thread that I have created located here.

27
Apr

How To: Install VirtualBox on Ubuntu 8.04LTS (Hardy Heron) [Tutorial]

vbox_logo2_gradient.png

Introduction:

This guide is intended to help users fully install VirtualBox and all of it’s features which don’t work out of the box such as USB support.

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18
Nov

How To: Properly Backup a VirtualBox Machine (.VDI)

Update on 27 July 2011:

The VM cloning tool is now built into the GUI as of VirtualBox 4.1. See the changelog:

VirtualBox 4.1.0 (released 2011-07-19)

This version is a major update. The following major new features were added:

    Support for cloning of VMs (bug #5853, see the manual for more information): full clones can be created through the GUI and VBoxManage, linked clones only through VBoxManage
    GUI: enhanced wizard for creating new virtual disks
    GUI: new wizard for copying virtual disks
    ...

Original Post:

First of all, these are the instructions for a VirtualBox installation on a Linux host.  It may or may not be the same directory structure/commands for Windows or Mac OS X hosts.

Most people don’t realize that making a backup of a VirtualBox Machine (.vdi) is more complex than just copy/paste. If you do that, you’ll soon realize (when it’s too late) that it doesn’t work! This is the proper way to backup your VirtualBox Machine:

VBoxManage clonevdi source destination

Example:
VBoxManage clonevdi ~/.VirtualBox/VDI/WindowsXP.vdi ~/WindowsXP_Backup.vdi

NOTE:  Although I’m not specifically sure, sometime after Version 2 of this software, the clonedvi command has been replaced with clonehd (see page 108 of the VirtualBox Manual), however, clonedvi will still work as they kept the backwards compatibility.

Then, wait for it to complete. It may take a while depending on the size of your .vdi file (or how much space you allocated towards your virtual machine).
What this actually does is create a new UUID (Universal Unique Identifier) for the cloned VM.  This way, you won’t end up with a message similar to this:

A hard disk with UUID {4d749826-6a3f-43ff-90af-42618783bd3a} or with the
same properties (’/home/martin/.VirtualBox/VDI/test.vdi’) is already
registered.

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